Some Basic questions on the use of CTRL and ALT Keys

joy99 subhakolkata1234 at gmail.com
Sat Nov 28 08:30:00 CET 2009


On Nov 28, 5:35 am, Steven D'Aprano <st... at REMOVE-THIS-
cybersource.com.au> wrote:
> On Fri, 27 Nov 2009 12:41:42 -0800, joy99 wrote:
> > Dear Group,
>
> > I have written a small and simple program like the following:
>
> > def alphabet1(n):
> >     file_open=open("/python26/alphabetlist1.txt","r")
> >     file_read=file_open.read()
> >     file_word=file_read.split()
> >     print file_word
>
> > Here, I am using a file “alphabetlist1.txt” which I am reading and then
> > splitting them into words.
>
> > In this file “alphabetlist1.txt” I have arranged few alphabets like the
> > following:
>
> > a A
> > b B
> > c C
> > d D
> > E e
> > F f
>
> > Where, a/b/c/d/e/f are in  lower case and A/B/C/D/E/F are in upper case
> > which I can say as
> > SHIFT+a
> > SHIFT+b
> > SHIFT+c
> > SHIFT+d
> > SHIFT+e
> > SHIFT+f
>
> > Now, in the list or anywhere in the program if I want to write
> > CTRL+a/b/c/d/e/f or ALT+a/b/c/d/e/f for which I may assign any value I
> > may feel not only cut/copy/paste.
>
> > How would I represent them?
>
> This question is badly defined. What are your constraints? Is this meant
> to be a human-readable program? If so, you need to stick to ASCII text
> and probably want something like:
>
> a A CTRL-A ALT-A
> b B CTRL-B ALT-B
> ...
>
> but I'm not sure what the point of that would be.
>
> Normally, control-combinations generate control-characters. For example,
> CTRL-M would normally generate a carriage-return character. Depending on
> your needs, you can write this as any of the following:
>
> a description: CTRL-M
> an escape sequence: \r
> caret notation: ^M
> the standard abbreviation: CR
> the Unicode display glyph: ␍
> or an actual carriage-return character.
>
> Note that in ASCII control characters only have a standard definition for
> the following:
>
> ctrl-@
> ctrl-A through ctrl-Z
> ctrl-[
> ctrl-\
> ctrl-]
> ctrl-^
> ctrl-_
> ctrl-?
>
> See here for more:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Control_characters
>
> As for Alt-combinations, I don't think there is any standard for what
> they are. I believe that they are operating system specific, and possibly
> even program specific.
>
> --
> Steven- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

It seems the following site:
http://knopok.net/symbol-codes/alt-codes
is quite resourceful on Alt.
Regards,
Subhabrata.



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