[OT] organizing your scripts, with plenty of re-use

Gabriel Genellina gagsl-py2 at yahoo.com.ar
Tue Oct 13 18:18:52 CEST 2009


En Tue, 13 Oct 2009 03:48:00 -0300, Dennis Lee Bieber  
<wlfraed at ix.netcom.com> escribió:
> On Mon, 12 Oct 2009 16:36:58 -0700, Ethan Furman <ethan at stoneleaf.us>
> declaimed the following in gmane.comp.python.general:
>
>> coffe table, you look in your car, etc, etc, and so forth.  If you move
>> a file in a package to somewhere else, and you don't tell the package
>> where it's at, it's not going to start looking all over the hard-drive
>> for it.  If that were the case you would have to be extra careful to
>> have every module's name be distinct, and then what's the point of
>> having packages?
>>
> 	Heh... Digging up some ancient history but... TRS-80 TRSDOS6 (and
> some earlier incarnations too) WOULD search all active drives if no
> drive letter was specified (no subdirectories, of course -- and I never
> had a hard drive on mine [$5000 for a 5MB drive?], just the two
> floppies). And for creating files, again if no drive were specified, it
> would create the file on the first drive that was not write-protected.

In the old MSDOS era, there was the APPEND command. It was used to set a  
list of directories or subdirectories that were searched for data files  
(in a way similar as PATH works for executable files). For example, after  
APPEND c:\pirulo\data;doc
you could edit a file like c:\foo\doc\readme.txt directly from the c:\foo  
directory:

c:\foo> edit readme.txt

and because of "doc" being in the APPEND path, edit would find it. I think  
Stef would enjoy using it - just listing each subdirectory would make the  
disk tree completely flat as seen by the application.

I think this functionality was removed by the time Windows 95 came out  
because it was very dangerous. It was extremely easy to open (or even  
remove!) the wrong file.

-- 
Gabriel Genellina




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