Plotting wav file

Rami Chowdhury rami.chowdhury at gmail.com
Mon Sep 21 22:25:40 CEST 2009


> On Mon, Sep 21, 2009 at 4:11 PM, Rami Chowdhury
> <rami.chowdhury at gmail.com> wrote:
>> On Mon, 21 Sep 2009 12:53:44 -0700, Maggie <la.foma at gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> I am by far more acquainted with R and generally would use it in this
>>> case, however, this particular experiment does require a lot of AFNI
>>> work, therefore I am a bit lost.
>>> the .wav was generated via --
>>>
>>> waver -WAV -TR 2.5 -tstim `cat a_STD_W.1D`  > a_STD_W.WAV
>>>
>>
>> Could you post a small snippet of the .wav file itself? My  
>> understanding is
>> that it's simply a column of numbers, in which case it should be fairly
>> simple to plot them.

On Mon, 21 Sep 2009 13:14:08 -0700, Maggie <la.foma at gmail.com> wrote:

> You're correct! This is the beginning of the .wav file.
>
> 0
> 0
> 0.19385
> 6.79566
> 7.62695
> 1.91679
> -1.71133
[snip]
> and so on..
>

That seems fairly straightforward -- assuming the .wav file is small  
enough, I'd suggest simply reading the values into a list, and then using  
one of the many Python plotting packages  
(http://wiki.python.org/moin/NumericAndScientific/Plotting) to graph them  
however you need. If you're familiar with R, I might suggest using RPy  
(http://rpy.sourceforge.net/rpy.html), although I've not used it myself.




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