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Grant Edwards invalid at invalid.invalid
Sat Oct 16 06:46:18 CEST 2010


On 2010-10-15, Martin Gregorie <martin at address-in-sig.invalid> wrote:
> On Fri, 15 Oct 2010 19:59:13 +0000, Grant Edwards wrote:
>
>> 
>> We're talking about Unix.
>> We're not talking about CP/M, DOS, RSX-11m, Apple-SOS, etc.
>
> That's just your assumption.

If you go back and look at my original posting in this thread, here's
what I was replying to:

   In the Unix world, which includes OS X, text tools tend to have
   difficulty with tabs. Or try naming a file with a newline or
   carriage return in the file name, or a NULL byte. "Works fine" is
   not how I would describe it.

I think that was pretty much the only quoted text in my posting, and
my question about how to create such a file was immediately below that
paragraph, so I'm surprised that somebody would infer I was replying
to something else.
   
> Track back up the thread and you'll see that the OP didn't mention an
> OS.

True, but I wasn't replying to the OP.  I was replying to a statement
about how applications "in the Unix world" behave when presented with
a filename containing a null byte.  I thought it obvious that my
question was regarding "the unix world".

> He merely said that he was using zlib, and getting unfortunate
> results when he handled its output, so he could have been using any
> OS.
>
> Rhodri James assumed that the OS was Windows, but it wasn't until the
> 6th post that Steven D'Aprano mentioned Unix and null characters.

And it was Steven D'Aprano's post to which I was replied with a
question about how such a file could be created.

> I got sucked into the null trap - sorry - because I actually meant to
> generalise the discussion into ways of getting a range of unwanted 
> characters into a file name and why its unwise to use a filename
> without checking it for characters the OS doesn't like before
> creating a file with it.

I'm not disagreeing that in Unix you can create filenames with all
sorts of inadvisable properties.  30 years ago I found backspaces and
cursor control escape sequences to particularly amusing the first time
I realized you could put them in filenames (that was under VMS, but
you could do the same thing under Unix or most of the other OSes I've
used).

-- 
Grant




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