Create a GUI and EXE for a python app?

python at bdurham.com python at bdurham.com
Fri Oct 29 03:00:56 CEST 2010


Grant,

>> Tkinter is built-in and available on Windows, Mac, and Linux. If you're
>> using Python 2.7 or 3.1 you can take advantage of Tkinter's ttk (Tile)
>> support for platform native user interfaces.

> You get a native UI using the correct theme even on Linux under Qt or GTk?

That's an excellent question. I don't know. What I can attest to is the 
high quality of ttk's native interface on Windows and Mac (Aqua).

> From what I've read of ttk, it still isn't using native UI elements.
It just has a bunch of its own "themes" that look mostly/sort-of like
native UI elements. Right?

I don't think this statement is accurate. But I'm also no expert on this
topic either. The following links on from my research on the topic of
Python and ttk (Tile):

Here's the basis for the new ttk (Tile) technology (independent of
Python)
http://www.tcl.tk/cgi-bin/tct/tip/48

An excellent ttk tutorial with screenshots and Python code
http://www.tkdocs.com

A presentation titled "Tkinter does not suck"
http://www.slideshare.net/r1chardj0n3s/tkinter-does-not-suck

> Under Linux does ttk automagically pick the theme that looks most like
the current Qt or Gtk theme? On systems where both are installed, how 
does ttk decide whether to look like Qt or Gtk?

I hope someone on this list can answer these questions.

> In addition to looking like native UI elements, does ttk also change
UI behaviors to match native UI elements?  For example will it
automatically use emacs key-bindings for text-entry editing if that's
enabled in my Gtk configuration?

Another excellent question. If you have Python 2.7 or 3.1 you should be
able to answer these questions yourself. The tkdocs.com website 
mentioned above has copy and paste Python code you can use.

Malcolm



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