FBI wants public help solving encrypted notes from murder mystery

haha doh rellikmaet at gmail.com
Fri Apr 1 06:07:26 CEST 2011


On Mar 31, 3:15 pm, Joe Snodgrass <joe.s... at yahoo.com> wrote:
> On Mar 30, 10:18 pm, "Stretto" <Stre... at Nowhere.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
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> > "Joe Snodgrass" <joe.s... at yahoo.com> wrote in message
>
> >news:c37e8e0b-a825-4ac5-9886-8828ab1faf94 at x8g2000prh.googlegroups.com...
>
> > > FBI cryptanalysis hasn’t decrypted notes from 1999 murder mystery
>
> > >http://tinyurl.com/4d56zsz
>
> > > The FBI is seeking the public's help in breaking the encrypted code
> > > found in two notes discovered on the body of a murdered man in 1999.
>
> > > The FBI says that officers in St. Louis, Missouri discovered the body
> > > of 41-year-old Ricky McCormick on June 30, 1999 in a field and the
> > > clues regarding the homicide were two encrypted notes found in the
> > > victim's pants pockets.
>
> > > The FBI says that despite extensive work by its Cryptanalysis and
> > > Racketeering Records Unit (CRRU), and the American Cryptogram
> > > Association, the meanings of those two coded notes remain a mystery
> > > and McCormick's murderer has never been found. One has to wonder
> > > though, if the FBI can't figure this out, who can? But I digress.
>
> > > From the FBI: "The more than 30 lines of coded material use a
> > > maddening variety of letters, numbers, dashes, and parentheses.
> > > McCormick was a high school dropout, but he was able to read and write
> > > and was said to be 'street smart.' According to members of his family,
> > > McCormick had used such encrypted notes since he was a boy, but
> > > apparently no one in his family knows how to decipher the codes, and
> > > it's unknown whether anyone besides McCormick could translate his
> > > secret language. Investigators believe the notes in McCormick's
> > > pockets were written up to three days before his death."
>
> > > "Standard routes of cryptanalysis seem to have hit brick walls," said
> > > CRRU chief Dan Olson in a statement. To move the case forward,
> > > examiners need another sample of McCormick's coded system-or a similar
> > > one-that might offer context to the mystery notes or allow valuable
> > > comparisons to be made. Or, short of new evidence, Olson said, "Maybe
> > > someone with a fresh set of eyes might come up with a brilliant new
> > > idea."
>
> > > The FBI says it has always relied on public tips and other assistance
> > > to solve crimes though breaking a code may represent a special
> > > circumstance.
>
> > > For larger images of the notes go here. [LINK]
>
> > > If you have an idea how to break the code, have seen similar codes, or
> > > have any information about the Ricky McCormick case, write to CRRU at
> > > the following address:
>
> > > FBI Laboratory
> > > Cryptanalysis and Racketeering Records Unit
> > > 2501 Investigation Parkway
> > > Quantico, VA 22135
> > > Attn: Ricky McCormick Case
>
> > > There is no reward being offered, just the knowledge that you may be
> > > solving an intriguing murder mystery, the FBI stated.
>
> > No other information about the guy? It might help. If the note is of any use
> > then people and places would be in it. If that is the case then it would
> > help to know where he lived and some of the names of people he knows.
>
> > The note seems like it may not be just encrypted but a sort of
> > compression(or rather shorthand/jargon) was used. Was the guy a drug dealer?
> > It could be a list of "clients" or information about where he sold drugs(the
> > numbers look like street addresses or amounts.
>
> > If these kinda notes were so common from this guy then surely the FBI should
> > have many more?
>
> > Seems like the FBI could do more if they wanted it really solved...
>
> As to which crime was being committed, I'm going with numbers running
> or loan sharking.  There's no reason for any crook to keep any record
> of any other crime, except prostitution, where phone books come in
> handy.
>
> Thievery is not an honest business, and records of what went down,
> where and with whom can only hurt you.  Unless of course, it's a grand
> list of felonies that he was using to blackmail the participants.
>
> But I can't see gathering that much info from blackmail.  I always
> thought it involved one guy blackmailing one victim.  This would imply
> a factory scale process, and he'd need some way to lure his prey into
> the trap.
>
> Of course, that WOULD be a good way to get murdered.
This is him
http://img851.imageshack.us/i/4d93ac54b10bcimage.jpg/




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