Guido rethinking removal of cmp from sort method

rantingrick rantingrick at gmail.com
Mon Apr 4 23:10:56 CEST 2011


On Apr 2, 5:13 am, Steven D'Aprano <steve
+comp.lang.pyt... at pearwood.info> wrote:

> "Should I use the list, list2, sortable_list, sortable_list2,
> sortable_lost3, [note spelling, which we're stuck with forever],
> heterogeneous_list, heterogeneous_list_without_stooge_sort, new_list,
> fancy_list, fancy_list2, fancy_list_with_extra_oomph, newer_than_new_list
> or list3?"
>
> Each and every interface carries a cost. Even if it is small, that cost
> must be weighed up against the benefits, rather than declaring that all
> interfaces are sacred once published.

Yes and whilst that was a brilliant display of bombastic arrogance
your statements miss the point completely. And to respond i'll pull a
sentence from your own post...

> None of those assumptions are even *remotely* true in the real world.

Moving on...

> Removing a published interface imposes a one-time cost on those using
> that interface, but it has an on-going benefit for all.

Oh really? And what about the large steaming pile of elephant dung in
the room your nose seems to be unable to smell?  You just *assume*
that more "new hands" are hopping on board the old Python vessel to
hell than "old hands" are dangling on to the rudders for dear life.
What a naive assumption Mr. D'Aprano!

As we all know Python has experienced an explosion of usage over the
past years, however i would say with the confusions of the Python2 to
Python3 conversion, old tutorials, Ruby's competition, and just plain
mis information in the wild we have cast deep into the throes of a
internal Pythonic rejection-ism and now find ourselves teetering on
the brink of full blown world wide Pythonic recession-ism unless we
get this runaway ship under control very quickly.

Now whilst i agree with most of the changes in Python3 i wonder if
some of them could have waited until Python4. We seemed to have become
so pedantic as to render ourselves blind to the cries of others. And
when i say "others" i am not speaking general "others". No, i am
speaking of fellow tried and true Pythonistas who have many years of
investment in this language. Folks who have vast libraries of Python
code that have been rendered useless because a few elites have spent
too much time lamenting minutia.

Where is the call from on high to rid the web of old Python2.x tuts
and ring in the era of Python3.x compatibility? Where is the energy to
re-ignite the flames of collaborative community? Where is the
leadership this community desperately needs? Where is the excitement
for the future of Python in the old hats? Oh yes i forgot... they're
too busy porting 2.x code to give a flying fig!




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