socket.rcv timeout while-loop

Dwayne Blind dwayneblind at gmail.com
Fri Feb 4 01:25:36 CET 2011


or rather

     timeout = s.gettimeout()
     b=time.clock()
     while time.clock()-b<3 :
          s.settimeout(3-time.clock()+b)
           try :
               data=s.recv(1024)
          except :
               break
     s.settimeout(timeout)

Sorry for all these messages

Dwayne


2011/2/4 Dwayne Blind <dwayneblind at gmail.com>

> The solution would be
>
>
>      timeout = s.gettimeout()
>      s.settimeout(3)
>      b=time.clock()
>      while time.clock()-b<3 :
>            try :
>                data=s.recv(1024)
>           except :
>                break
>      s.settimeout(timeout)
>
> Am I right ?
>
> Dwayne
>
> 2011/2/4 Dwayne Blind <dwayneblind at gmail.com>
>
> Thanks Stephen. It's really nice of you.
>>
>> I have not understood everything though. (I have never used a context
>> manager before.)
>>
>> Here are some comments :
>>
>>      timeout = s.gettimeout()    # Is that the default timeout ?
>>      s.settimeout(3) # I guess this is a 3 second timeout
>>      s.recv(1024)
>>      s.settimeout(timeout) # You change it back ?
>>
>> So with a while loop, it should be :
>>
>>
>>      timeout = s.gettimeout()
>>      s.settimeout(3)
>>      b=time.clock()
>>      while time.clock()-b<3 :
>>
>>           data=s.recv(1024)
>>      s.settimeout(timeout)
>>
>> Am I right ?
>>
>> Thanks again,
>> Dwayne
>>
>>
>> 2011/2/3 Stephen Hansen <me+list/python at ixokai.io>
>>
>>> On 2/3/11 10:13 AM, Dwayne Blind wrote:
>>>
>>> > Thanks for your answer. I don't want to reset my socket. I want to
>>> apply
>>> > the timeout to the rcv method only.
>>>
>>> Setting the timeout does not "reset [your] socket", I don't think. And I
>>> get that you want to only timeout recv... that's why I pointed out its a
>>> socket method, not an argument to recv. If you don't want it to apply to
>>> everything else, you just have to be sure to change it back after recv.
>>>
>>> Just:
>>>  timeout = s.gettimeout()
>>>  s.settimeout(3)
>>>  s.recv(1024)
>>>  s.settimeout(timeout)
>>>
>>> Personally, I'd prefer to do:
>>>
>>> with timeout(s, 3):
>>>    s.recv(1024)
>>>
>>> That's a lot more clear, and I'd roll this context manager to accomplish
>>> it:
>>>
>>> --- start
>>>
>>> from contextlib import contextmanager
>>>
>>> @contextmanager
>>> def timeout(sock, timeout):
>>>    old_timeout = sock.gettimeout()
>>>    sock.settimeout(timeout)
>>>    try:
>>>        yield sock
>>>    finally:
>>>        sock.settimeout(old_timeout)
>>>
>>> --- end
>>>
>>> The contextmanager decorator is an easy/quick way of making a context
>>> manager. Everything up until the yield is executed before the 'with'
>>> block is run, and everything after the yield is executed after the
>>> 'with' block concludes.
>>>
>>> If the with block throws an exception, it'll be catchable at the yield
>>> point.
>>>
>>> --
>>>
>>>   Stephen Hansen
>>>   ... Also: Ixokai
>>>   ... Mail: me+list/python (AT) ixokai (DOT) io
>>>   ... Blog: http://meh.ixokai.io/
>>>
>>>
>>
>
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