Calling Values

subhabangalore at gmail.com subhabangalore at gmail.com
Fri Aug 3 20:23:58 CEST 2012


On Friday, August 3, 2012 10:50:52 PM UTC+5:30, Dennis Lee Bieber wrote:
> On Fri, 3 Aug 2012 04:49:46 -0700 (PDT), Subhabrata
> 
> <subhabangalore at gmail.com> declaimed the following in
> 
> gmane.comp.python.general:
> 
> 
> 
> > Dear Group,
> 
> > 
> 
> > I am trying to call the values of one function in the another function in the following way:
> 
> 
> 
> 	Technically, "the values of one function" are whatever it RETURNS;
> 
> 
> 
> > def func1():
> 
> > 	num1=10
> 
> > 	num2=20
> 
> > 	print "The Second Number is:",num2
> 
> > 	return
> 
> >
> 
> 	This function returns None.
> 
> 
> 
> 	Recommended software design practices are that any thing inside the
> 
> function should be local to just that function -- a function should be a
> 
> black box -- you call it with some data, and you obtain some results
> 
> when it returns; what it does internally should be "invisible" and have
> 
> no effect on any other code.
> 
> 
> 
> 	Read:
> 
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coupling_%28computer_programming%29
> 
> (what you are attempting falls into "content coupling" if you change the
> 
> use of "module" to "function")
> 
> 
> 
> 	However, Python lets you declare names to be global (to the
> 
> module/file). This is primarily meant to be used when a function must
> 
> rebind a module level entity. (This would be "common coupling")
> 
> 
> 
> def func1():
> 
> 	global num1, num2
> 
> 	...
> 
> 
> 
> But, as mentioned, that now makes num1 and num2 names that are known
> 
> outside the functions.
> 
>  
> 
> > def func2():
> 
> > 	num3=num1+num2
> 
> > 	num4=num3+num1
> 
> > 	print "New Number One is:",num3
> 
> > 	print "New Number Two is:",num4
> 
> > 	return
> 
> > 
> 
> 	Misleading print statements, as you are NOT changing "number one" or
> 
> "number two"; you've just created two NEW names (num3, num4).
> 
> 
> 
> > I am preferring not to use argument passing or using class? Is there any alternate way?
> 
> >
> 
> 
> 
> 	Well, if you end func1 with
> 
> 
> 
> 	return num1, num2
> 
> 
> 
> you can change func2 into:
> 
> 
> 
> def func2():
> 
> 	n1, n2 = func1()
> 
> 	num3 = n1 + n2
> 
> 	num4 = num3 + n1
> 
> ...
> 
> -- 
> 
> 	Wulfraed                 Dennis Lee Bieber         AF6VN
> 
>         wlfraed at ix.netcom.com    HTTP://wlfraed.home.netcom.com/

Dear Group,
Absolutely brilliant, Ramit.  Dennis also came with almost same answer.  Using global may not give clean results everytime. 

I wanted to say, 
>>> def func1():
	num1=10
	num2=20
	print "The Second Number is:",num2

	
>>> def func2():
	func1()
	num3=50
	print "The New Number is:",num3

>>> func2()
The Second Number is: 20
The New Number is: 50
The post went slightly wrong sorry. 
No, I experiment myself on idle evenings to experiment with coding etc so I think of problems, practice on them and try to see if any better code evolves. Nothing else. I posted and Steve did not comment perhaps never happens. He rebukes me so much from my early days here, I just enjoy it.

Regards and best wishes,
Subhabrata. 





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