Understanding Code

subhabangalore at gmail.com subhabangalore at gmail.com
Fri Nov 16 21:39:31 CET 2012


On Tuesday, November 13, 2012 4:12:52 PM UTC+5:30, Peter Otten wrote:
> subhabangalore at gmail.com wrote:
> 
> 
> 
> > Dear Group,
> 
> > To improve my code writing I am trying to read good codes. Now, I have
> 
> > received a code,as given below,(apology for slight indentation errors) the
> 
> > code is running well. Now to comprehend the code, I am looking to
> 
> > understand it completely.
> 
> > 
> 
> > class Calculate:
> 
> >       def __init__(self):
> 
> >         self.prior = {}
> 
> >         self.total = {}
> 
> >         self.count = 0
> 
> >       def add(self, cls, obs):
> 
> >         self.prior[cls] = self.prior.get(cls, 0) + 1
> 
> >         for idx, val in enumerate(obs):
> 
> >             key = cls, idx, val
> 
> >             self.total[key] = self.total.get(key, 0) + 1
> 
> >         self.count += 1
> 
> >       def discr(self, cls, obs):
> 
> >         result = self.prior[cls]/self.count
> 
> >         for idx, val in enumerate(obs):
> 
> >             freq = self.total.get((cls, idx, val), 0)
> 
> >             result *= freq/self.prior[cls]
> 
> >         return result
> 
> >       def classify(self, obs):
> 
> >         candidates = [(self.discr(c, obs), c) for c in self.prior]
> 
> >         return max(candidates)[1]
> 
> > 
> 
> > I am not understanding many parts of it, I am understanding many parts of
> 
> > it also.
> 
> > 
> 
> > So I am looking for an exercise what are the things I should know to
> 
> > understand it, (please do not give answers I would get back with the
> 
> > answers in a week and would discuss even how to write better than this).
> 
> 
> 
> Start with running the code for the simplest piece of the class:
> 
> >>> c = Calculate()
> 
> >>> c.add("x", [1,2,3])
> 
> 
> 
> Then inspect the attributes:
> 
> 
> 
> >>> c.prior
> 
> {'x': 1}
> 
> >>> c.total
> 
> {('x', 2, 3): 1, ('x', 1, 2): 1, ('x', 0, 1): 1}
> 
> >>> c.count
> 
> 
> 
> Now read the code for Calculate.add(). Do you understand what
> 
> 
> 
> >         self.prior[cls] = self.prior.get(cls, 0) + 1
> 
> 
> 
> does? Experiment with a dict and its get() method in the interactive 
> 
> interpreter. Next to the loop.
> 
> 
> 
> >         for idx, val in enumerate(obs):
> 
> >             key = cls, idx, val
> 
> >             self.total[key] = self.total.get(key, 0) + 1
> 
> >         self.count += 1
> 
> 
> 
> Do you understand what enumerate() does? If not read its documentation with
> 
> 
> 
> >>> help(enumerate)
> 
> 
> 
> Do you understand what key looks like? If you don't add a print statement
> 
> 
> 
> >         for idx, val in enumerate(obs):
> 
> >             key = cls, idx, val
> 
>               print key
> 
> >             self.total[key] = self.total.get(key, 0) + 1
> 
> >         self.count += 1
> 
> 
> 
> What does
> 
> 
> 
> >             self.total[key] = self.total.get(key, 0) + 1
> 
> 
> 
> do? Note that this line is very similar to
> 
> 
> 
> >         self.prior[cls] = self.prior.get(cls, 0) + 1
> 
> 
> 
> which you have studied before.
> 
> 
> 
> >         self.count += 1
> 
> 
> 
> This like the rest of your class is left as an exercise. The routine is 
> 
> always the same: 
> 
> 
> 
> - break parts that you don't understand into smaller parts
> 
> - consult the documentation on unknown classes, functions, methods, 
> 
> preferrably with help(some_obj) or dir(some_obj)
> 
> - run portions of the code or similar code in the interactive interpreter or 
> 
> with a little throw-away script.
> 
> - add print statements to inspect variables at interesting points in your 
> 
> script.

Dear Sir,

Thank you for your kind guidance.
I tried to do the following exercises,

(i) On dict.get():

>>> tel = {'jack': 4098, 'sape': 4139, 'obama':3059,'blair':3301}
>>> dict.get('obama')

>>> tel.get('obama')
3059

>>> for i in tel:
	x1=tel.get(i)
	print x1

	
4139
3301
4098
3059
>>> 
>>> tel.get('blair',0)
3301
>>> 
>>> tel.get('blair',0)+1
3302
>>>  


(ii) On enumerate:
>>> list1=["Man","Woman","Gentleman","Lady","Sir","Madam"]
>>> for i,j in enumerate(list1):
	print i,j

	
0 Man
1 Woman
2 Gentleman
3 Lady
4 Sir
5 Madam
>>> 

(iii) Trying to check the values individually:
>>> class Calculate:
    def __init__(self):
        self.prior = {}  
        self.total = {}  
        self.count = 0   
    def add(self, cls, obs):
        self.prior[cls] = self.prior.get(cls, 0) + 1
        for idx, val in enumerate(obs):
            key = cls, idx, val
            print key
            self.total[key] = self.total.get(key, 0) + 1
        self.count += 1

        
>>> x1=Calculate()
>>> x1.add("x", [1,2,3])
('x', 0, 1)
('x', 1, 2)
('x', 2, 3)

>>> class Calculate:
    
    def __init__(self):
        self.prior = {}  
        self.total = {}  
        self.count = 0   

    def add(self, cls, obs):
        self.prior[cls] = self.prior.get(cls, 0) + 1
        for idx, val in enumerate(obs):
            key = cls, idx, val
            self.total[key] = self.total.get(key, 0) + 1
        self.count += 1

    def discr(self, cls, obs):
        result = self.prior[cls]/self.count
        for idx, val in enumerate(obs):
            freq = self.total.get((cls, idx, val), 0)
            print freq
            result *= freq/self.prior[cls]
            print result

            
>>> x2=Calculate()
>>> x2.add("x", [7,8,9])
>>> x2.discr("x", [7,8,9])
1
1.0
1
1.0
1
1.0
>>> 

Based on these exercises,I tried to we can say,
self.total is dictionary format,and key is cls,idx,val, where cls is assigned in the self.prior. 

The next function is more or less same but here cls is called from earlier function.

Please let me know how I am addressing it and if I have to do any extra bit?

Regards,
Subhabrata.  


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