Experiences/guidance on teaching Python as a first programming language

wxjmfauth at gmail.com wxjmfauth at gmail.com
Thu Dec 12 17:20:45 CET 2013


Le jeudi 12 décembre 2013 15:47:40 UTC+1, Chris Angelico a écrit :
> On Fri, Dec 13, 2013 at 1:34 AM,  <wxjmfauth at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> > Le jeudi 12 décembre 2013 11:28:35 UTC+1, Chris Angelico a écrit :
> 
> >> On Thu, Dec 12, 2013 at 8:17 PM,  <wxjmfauth at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> >>
> 
> >> > Windows, Py2.(7), ascii. It is not a secret Python uses
> 
> >> > ascii for the representation.
> 
> >>
> 
> >> Actually no, it doesn't.
> 
> >
> 
> >>>> sys.version
> 
> > '2.7.6 (default, Nov 10 2013, 19:24:18) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)]'
> 
> >>>> sys.stdout.encoding
> 
> > 'cp1252'
> 
> 
> 
> What has this to do with ASCII or with Python's internal
> 
> representation? All you've proven is that you can convert the repr of
> 
> a string back into a byte-string, by replacing "\\xa9" with "\xa9",
> 
> and then shown that you can successfully render that as CP-1252 and it
> 
> displays as a copyright symbol. Meanwhile when I try the same thing on
> 
> my Windows box, the default encoding is cp437, so it throws. Proves
> 
> nothing about ASCII, as neither of those encodings is ASCII, and A9
> 
> does not decode as ASCII.
> 
> 


Are you understanding Python by chance? print, __repr__, __str__,
sys.std*.encoding, ...
Are you understanding Windows? CHCP
Are you understanding the coding of the characters? cp1252, cp850, cp437, ...

Python (2) is managing 	all this very well. Unfortunately, not in
a friendly way.

jmf



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