Python Newbie

Chris Angelico rosuav at gmail.com
Sat Feb 23 16:51:58 CET 2013


On Sun, Feb 24, 2013 at 2:43 AM, Steve Simmons <square.steve at gmail.com> wrote:
> I get the impression that you are a developer of some experience on a single
> language.  I wouldn't call myself a developer but I have written, modified
> and/or debugged software in upwards of 20 languages and, from that
> perspective, I would say that the second language you learn is probably the
> hardest for the simple reason that you have to put away a bunch of learned
> prejudices and learn a whole new set.  After three or four, you start to see
> the commonalities and differences and 'get' why they exist and you find
> yourself with a new set of learned prejudices :-) but you also gain the
> perspective that some languages are good at 'this' while others are good at
> 'that'.

+1000

When you learn your first language, you think you're learning to
program, but that's not really accurate. Once you've learned half a
dozen, you begin to understand something of the art of coding as
distinct from any particular language; after that, you can learn any
language fairly easily.

Steve, why do you say you're not a developer? A score of languages
under your belt, choosing to write code in your spare time, and
speaking competently on the comparative merits of different languages
and why you made the decision you made - sounds like you're every bit
a coder. Don't run yourself down so! :)

ChrisA



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