book advice

rusi rustompmody at gmail.com
Wed Mar 6 11:10:31 CET 2013


On Mar 2, 1:59 am, leonardo selmi <l.se... at icloud.com> wrote:
> hi
>
> is there anyone can suggest me a good book to learn python? i read many but there is always
> something unclear or examples which give me errors.

The following written assuming you are as new to programming generally
as to python specifically.
If not then please excuse me. it is written based on this line:

> how can I start building a sound educational background

It is completely natural that you assume learning programming means
learning a programming language.
And in that context python is as good a choice as you could make.

However the assumption is wrong-headed.

Sure you cannot program without using some programming language. Yet
knowing a programming language does not do much by way of knowing
programming.
Look up any of the online resources on computer science and you will
find courses/material on a variety of stuff such as:
- operating systems
- compilers
- data structures
- algorithms
- a variety of almost unrelated flavors of math (eg graph theory,
discrete math, numerical analysis)
- a variety of almost unrelated flavors of theory (eg semantics,
automata theory etc)
- then all sorts of 'modern' stuff eg web/security/cloud etc

Somewhere in all this you would find a course on programming languages
and an intro course on programming -- probably using python or some
other language.

Now I will admit that this 'classical' approach is often misguided and
has wrong emphasis.
I have a series of blog posts starting
http://blog.languager.org/2011/02/cs-education-is-fat-and-weak-1.html
on the mess in CS education.

However the mess in CS education notwithstanding, the fact does not
change that for a 'sound educational background' you should be
spending 1/5 your time on a specific programming technology such as
python and the remaining on more generic stuff such as Ive listed above



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