Help with python code!

Chris Angelico rosuav at gmail.com
Sun Mar 31 23:21:00 CEST 2013


On Mon, Apr 1, 2013 at 8:06 AM, jojo <gerrymcgovern at gmail.com> wrote:
> On Sunday, March 31, 2013 4:39:11 PM UTC-4, Chris Angelico wrote:
>> On Mon, Apr 1, 2013 at 7:10 AM, jojo wrote:
>>
>> > Im used to C# so the syntax looks bizarre to me! Any help would be great.
>>
>>
>>
>> The first thing you'll need to understand about Python syntax is that
>>
>> indentation is important. By posting this code flush-left, you've
>>
>> actually destroyed its block structure. Could you post it again, with
>>
>> indentation, please? We'd then be in a much better position to help.
>>
>>
>>
>> Chris Angelico
>
>
> Hi Chris, thanks for your reply. See code below...

Ah, you appear to be posting from Google Groups. You may want to check
this page out, as a lot of people rather dislike GG posts.

http://wiki.python.org/moin/GoogleGroupsPython

The best method is simply to avoid Google Groups altogether.

Anyway, some code comments. (Though the biggest comment to make about
the code is its utter lack of comments. Not a good idea in any
language, for anything more than the most trivial script.)

> current_time = time.time() + 60*60+24*30

This line doesn't, quite frankly, make a lot of sense; time.time()
returns the current time already, but then an offset of one hour and
twelve minutes is added.

>    if m:
>       sue = time.mktime(
>         (int(m.group(7)), int(months[m.group(2)]), int(m.group(3)),
>           int(m.group(4)), int(m.group(5)), int(m.group(6)),
>           int(days[m.group(1)]), 0, 0)
>         )
>         expire_time = (sue ­ current_time)/60/60/24

Here's a likely problem. There's supposed to be an operator - probably
a plus sign - between sue and current_time.

>        else:
>         m = q.search(line)
>         if m:
>         cert_name = m.group(1)

And this last line needs indentation.

The very easiest way to debug Python code is to run it. If it runs,
great! See what output it made and whether it's correct or not. If it
doesn't, Python will give you an exception traceback that points you
to the failing line. Get familiar with them, as you'll be seeing them
a lot :)

Chris Angelico



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