Completely and utterly Off Topic [was Re: Got a Doubt ! Wanting for your Help ! Plz make it ASAP !]

Mark Lawrence breamoreboy at yahoo.co.uk
Wed Nov 27 11:00:22 CET 2013


On 27/11/2013 06:48, Steven D'Aprano wrote:
> On Tue, 26 Nov 2013 17:26:48 -0800, Rick Johnson wrote:
>
>> Even if you are correct that the OP is using a regional variation of
>> English, you fail to realize that this "regional redefinition" of the
>> English word: "doubts" to mean what the *majority* of  English speaking
>> world understands as "questions", cannot be justified OUTSIDE of his
>> region.
>
> "Fail to realize"? What regional redefinition of "realise" is that? How
> do you justify using that regional variation outside of your region?

Had a really good chuckle over this, thanks.

>
>
>> It's not like he's using a NEW word; a word that has never been defined,
>> NO, his region has redefined a widely understood word.
> [...]
>> In the previous examples we show that introducing a NEW word is fine,
>> because, at least when we encounter a NEW word we will *instantly* know
>> that we need to find a definition for the NEW word BEFORE we can *fully*
>> comprehend what the author is trying to tell us.
>
> I completely sniglim with what you are saying. I'd go further and state
> that, without exception, your argument is the most vumtigious I've ever
> seen, and if there were any justice in the world, people would follow you
> down the street shouting "Gedus! Gedus!" and giving you a keddener. If
> anyone deserves it, it is you.
>

Don't have time now but search engine will be busy later, can't let 
these things pass unchequed.

>
> [...]
>> When we see the word "doubts", followed by an enumerated listing, we
>> falsely believe the lad
>
> "The lad"? Well, I suppose that's a step up from calling men twice your
> age "boy", but not much.
>
>
>> is confused or has some level of concern.
>
> Whereas when somebody says they have a question, we immediately assume
> that they are not confused, and have no concern at all.
>
>
> [...]
>> Now... *hopefully* we can understand why the words "question" and
>> "doubt" should NEVER be used interchangeably.
>
> Now Rick, I know that you're a speaker of a regional variation of
> English, so you might not be familiar with the standard meanings of the
> word "doubt" in English, including:
>
>      3.  A point about which one is uncertain or skeptical: reassured
>          me by answering my doubts.
>
> http://www.thefreedictionary.com/doubt
>
>
> It is without doubt that "question" and "doubt" are synonyms, or perhaps
> I should say that it is without question that "doubt" and "question" are
> synonyms.
>
> http://thesaurus.com/browse/doubt
>
> Of course, if you have any doubts about this, feel free to ask, we're
> happy to answer all reasonable questions.
>
>
> [...]
>>   "A new home-run record!"
>
> What is this "home-run" of which you speak? Houses don't generally run.
> Surely you're not using a regional idiom outside of your region?
>

I believe that he's referring to the need to rush home in order to use 
the toilet, water closet or whatever your dialect uses.  Apparently in 
some parts of the world a guy called John is constantly being urinated 
and defecated on, I'll admit to feeling really sorry for him.

-- 
Python is the second best programming language in the world.
But the best has yet to be invented.  Christian Tismer

Mark Lawrence




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