python for everyday tasks

Mark Lawrence breamoreboy at yahoo.co.uk
Mon Nov 25 14:33:35 CET 2013


On 25/11/2013 10:12, wxjmfauth at gmail.com wrote:
> Le samedi 23 novembre 2013 03:01:26 UTC+1, Steven D'Aprano a écrit :
>>
>> * Python 3 (although not Python 2) is one of the few languages that get
>>
>> Unicode *right*. Strings in Python 3 are text, sequences of Unicode
>>
>> characters, not a thinly disguised blob of bytes. Starting with Python
>>
>> 3.3, Python does away with the difference between "narrow builds" (which
>>
>> save memory at the expense of correctness) and "wide builds" (which give
>>
>> correct Unicode behaviour at the cost of memory). Instead, Python 3.3 now
>>
>> has optimized strings that use only as much memory as needed. Pure ASCII
>>
>> strings will use 1 byte per character, while Unicode strings use 1, 2 or
>>
>> 4 bytes per character as needed. And it all happens transparently.
>>

> [topic beeing more of less closed]
>
> Your paragraph is mixing different concepts.
>
> When it comes to save memory, utf-8 is the choice. It
> beats largely the FSR on the side of memory and on
> the side of performances.
>
> How and why? I suggest, you have a deeper understanding
> of unicode.
>
> May I recall, it is one of the coding scheme endorsed
> by "Unicode.org" and it is intensively used. This is not
> by chance.
>
> jmf
>

Yet more double spaced crap.

-- 
Python is the second best programming language in the world.
But the best has yet to be invented.  Christian Tismer

Mark Lawrence




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