What are the kinds of software that are not advisable to be developed using Python?

Steven D'Aprano steve+comp.lang.python at pearwood.info
Sun Feb 9 04:43:47 CET 2014


On Sat, 08 Feb 2014 21:53:00 -0500, Roy Smith wrote:

> In article <a584b0e9-1995-4189-bfac-d0c5ffc080c9 at googlegroups.com>,
>  Sam <lightaiyee at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> I got to know about Python a few months ago and today, I want to
>> develop only using Python because of its code readability. This is not
>> a healthy bias. To play my own devil's advocate, I have a question.
>> What are the kinds of software that are not advisable to be developed
>> using Python?
> 
> If execution speed is the most important thing, Python would be the
> wrong choice.

PyPy can generate code which is comparable to compiled C in speed. 
Perhaps you mean, "if execution speed is the most important thing, using 
a naive Python interpreter may not be fast enough".


> If you need to get very close to the hardware (such as when writing an
> operating system), Python would be the wrong choice.
> 
> If you are writing software for an environment which has a
> single-language ecosystem (i.e. iOS -> Objective C, or Android -> Java),
> Python would be the wrong choice.

https://github.com/kivy/python-for-android
https://ep2013.europython.eu/conference/talks/developing-android-apps-completely-in-python
https://python-for-android.readthedocs.org/en/latest/
http://qpython.com/


> If, for security/business reasons, shipping only the executable, without
> the end user having access to your original source, Python would be the
> wrong language.

Security by obscurity.

Nevertheless, although security by obscurity is ineffective[1], Python 
supports it. You can ship only the .pyc files. For added obscurity, you 
could put the .pyc files in a .zip file and ship that. For even more 
obscurity, you could write a custom importer, and then ship your python 
byte-code hidden in a mp3 or TIFF file.




[1] Shipping only compiled executables hasn't made Windows any more 
secure, prevented viruses and malware from taking advantage of zero-day 
exploits, or prevented software piracy.

-- 
Steven



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