Question about Source Control

Mark H Harris harrismh777 at gmail.com
Tue Mar 18 18:03:40 CET 2014


On 3/17/14 8:06 AM, Frank Millman wrote:
> All my source code resides on an old Linux server, which I switch on in the
> morning and switch off at night, but otherwise hardly ever look at. It uses
> 'samba' to allow sharing with Windows, and 'nfs' to allow sharing with other
> Linux machines.

hi Frank, I am using GIT and code.google.com.

    https://code.google.com/p/pythondecimallibrary/

    I have not used Code Google prior to the pdeclib project; however, I 
plan to use it in the future extensively, at least for my open source 
projects (and when I am thinking about bringing another person on board.

    Code Google permits three version|control|access systems (I use GIT, 
a very simple command line interface).  The thing is that the code 
resides on a person's machine as a clone of the repository, and is 
assessable from anywhere in the world, allows multiple developer 
participation, allows multiple branches|merge|master, and allows access 
to the source on-line (browse|edit), and permits new members to clone 
the repository from anywhere.  Downloads are zipped.

    The down-side is also the up-side. Code Google is an open source 
developer collaborative environment for sharing & managing. Anything you 
put there belongs to everyone in the project, and can be viewed by 
anyone in the world (which is kinda the point of open source).  There is 
a supreme benefit to having multiple eyes on the code. People maybe not 
even involved in the project directly will comment on the code (and they 
are not shy). You code will improve dynamically and radically (if you 
have the guts for it).

    It took me a couple of hours to get up to speed with Code Google. It 
took another hour or so to come up to speed with GIT. You need to create 
the project on Code Google first. Then on your machine, in the code 
directory (the directory actually holding the source files that you are 
going to make a part of your project) you do these things:

    git init
                    this builds the .git subdirectory needed for push

    git add file-name

                    add each filename you want to commit and push

    git remove

                    removes any unwanted files

    git commit -a

                    edit your commit comments here ,  or provide default


    git push  https://code.google.com/p/whateveryourprojectnameis/ master

                    sends the files on their way


    other files:    .gitconfig    .netrc


    You will place your name, email, and method (use simple) in the 
.gitconfig file.  The .netrc file will contain the login info for code 
google machine.


    Read the GIT manual on-line; its pretty easy too.

    https://www.kernel.org/pub/software/scm/git/docs/user-manual.html

    http://git-scm.com/documentation


Cheers






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