I am out of trial and error again Lists

Seymore4Head Seymore4Head at Hotmail.invalid
Fri Oct 24 19:42:51 CEST 2014


On Fri, 24 Oct 2014 10:42:08 -0700 (PDT), Rustom Mody
<rustompmody at gmail.com> wrote:

>On Friday, October 24, 2014 10:55:44 PM UTC+5:30, Seymore4Head wrote:
>> On Fri, 24 Oct 2014 19:18:12 +0200, "Albert Visser" wrote:
>> 
>> >On Fri, 24 Oct 2014 19:03:47 +0200, Seymore4Head  wrote:
>> >
>> >>
>> >> http://i.imgur.com/DTc5zoL.jpg
>> >>
>> >> The interpreter.   I don't know how to use that either.
>> >>
>> >
>> >It's what's on the left hand side of your screenshot. You can simply type  
>> >Python statements following the >>> prompt and hit enter to examine the  
>> >result, instead of pushing F5 to run your code
>> 
>> I guess I am confusing the Interpreter with the debugger.  Someone
>> suggested I use the Interpreter to step through line by line.
>> I don't know how to do that.
>
>Dont bother with the debugger just yet.
>For most python programmers, sticking a few print statements 
>(expressions in python 3) in adroitly is good enough.*
>
>For now best if you concentrate on
>1. What are the features of python -- the language
>2. What are the standard data types and functions -- the libraries
>3. How to use and jump between the two windows of your screenshot most
>   effectively. What you should and should not type in each etc
>
>* One neat trick of using the print to debug.
>Say you have a line like
>
>nx.append("2")
>
>and nx is not getting to be what you expect.
>Change it to
>
>nx.append("2"); print(nx)
>
>Cleaning up the print after debugging is easier than if you use a
>separate line like so
>
>nx.append("2")
>print(nx)
>
>[I think I learnt this trick from Mark Lawrence]

Useful tips
Thanks



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