Why Python has moved to a multilingual Unicode model

wxjmfauth at gmail.com wxjmfauth at gmail.com
Wed Sep 10 15:27:51 CEST 2014


Le mercredi 10 septembre 2014 14:20:42 UTC+2, Steven D'Aprano a écrit :
> Many Python 2 users (mostly English speakers, but also a few Europeans) are
> 
> frustrated with the move of Python 3 to Unicode strings instead of ASCII
> 
> strings.
> 
> 
> 
> One of the core Python developers, Nick Coghlan of Red Hat, has written an
> 
> article for the Red Hat Developer Blog explaining why the core devs have
> 
> made that major paradigm shift of text-as-ASCII-plus-bytes to
> 
> text-as-Unicode:
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> http://developerblog.redhat.com/2014/09/09/transition-to-multilingual-programming-python/
> 
> 

A "multilingual Unicode model" has not too much sense.

The Unicode Standard encodes [1] *characters* on a per script basis.
The "multilingualism" is only a consequence.

[1] Via a *unique* encoding mechanism. A *single* operator,
on a *single* set of elements (a repertoire of characters).
There is no other way to do it (mathematics).

---

Python 2.7 and the characters repertoire of the cp1252 coding
scheme works very well. It follows the rule given in [1].

jmf



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