Best search algorithm to find condition within a range

Dave Angel davea at davea.name
Sun Apr 19 20:52:23 CEST 2015


On 04/19/2015 09:02 AM, Steven D'Aprano wrote:
> On Sun, 19 Apr 2015 04:08 am, Albert van der Horst wrote:
>
>> Fire up a lowlevel interpreter like Forth. (e.g. gforth)
>
> Yay! I'm not the only one who uses or likes Forth!
>
> Have you tried Factor? I'm wondering if it is worth looking at, as a more
> modern and less low-level version of Forth.
>

I also like Forth (since 83), but haven't done much in the last decade.

I was newsletter editor for our local FIG for many years.

I have met and debated with Elizabeth Rather, and been a "third hand" 
for Chuck Moore when he was re-soldering wires on his prototype Forth board.

You can see my name in the X3J14 standard:
    https://www.taygeta.com/forth/dpans1.htm#x3j14.membership


I'd be interested in a "more modern" Forth, but naturally, as a member 
of band of rugged individualists, I wonder if it can possibly satisfy 
more than one of us.

<googling...>
http://factorcode.org/

That site is my first time I recall seeing "concatenative" as a type of 
language.  Interesting way of thinking of it.  I just call it RPN, and 
relate it to the original HP35 calculator ($400, in about 1972).

 From the overview, it looks like they're at least aiming at what I 
envisioned as the next Forth I wanted to use.  Instead of putting ints 
and addresses on the stack, you put refs to objects, in the Python 
sense.  Those objects are also gc'ed.  I don't know yet whether 
everything is an object, or whether (like Java), you have boxed and 
unboxed thingies.

Sounds interesting, and well worth investigating.  thanks for pointing 
it out.

-- 
DaveA



More information about the Python-list mailing list