How do I remove/unlink wildcarded files

Mark Lawrence breamoreboy at yahoo.co.uk
Sat Jan 3 11:38:21 CET 2015


On 03/01/2015 10:16, Chris Angelico wrote:
> On Sat, Jan 3, 2015 at 9:01 PM, Steven D'Aprano
> <steve+comp.lang.python at pearwood.info> wrote:
>> Chris Angelico wrote:
>>
>>> On Sat, Jan 3, 2015 at 4:54 AM, Rustom Mody <rustompmody at gmail.com> wrote:
>>>> And how does this strange language called English fits into your rules
>>>> and (no) special cases scheme?
>>>>
>>>>
>> http://www.omgfacts.com/lists/3989/Did-you-know-that-ough-can-be-pronounced-TEN-DIFFERENT-WAYS
>>>
>>> I learned six, which is no more than there are for the simple vowel
>>> 'a' (at least, in British English; American English has a few less
>>> sounds for 'a').
>>
>> What is this thing you call "American English"? :-)
>>
>> I wouldn't want to put an exact number of distinct accents in the USA, but
>> it's probably in three figures. And it used to be said that a sufficiently
>> skilled linguist could tell what side of the street an English person was
>> born on, that's how fine-grained English accents used to be.
>
> "American English" is the category compassing all of those accents
> common to the USA. There are certain broad similarities between it and
> British English, just as there are similarities between Dutch and
> German; and there are certain commonalities across all accents of
> American English, allowing generalizations about the number of sounds
> made by the vowel "a". :)
>

I used to get very confused watching the old westerns.  The child when 
talking about "more" and "paw" wasn't referring to possibly an 
adjective, noun or adverb and a part of an animal, but what we would 
refer to in the UK as "mum" and "dad" :)

-- 
My fellow Pythonistas, ask not what our language can do for you, ask
what you can do for our language.

Mark Lawrence




More information about the Python-list mailing list