An object is an instance (or not)?

Mario Figueiredo marfig at gmail.com
Wed Jan 28 01:35:07 CET 2015


In article <mailman.18195.1422405040.18130.python-list at python.org>, 
rosuav at gmail.com says...
> 
> On Wed, Jan 28, 2015 at 11:17 AM, Mario Figueiredo <marfig at gmail.com> wrote:
> > Means the object is capable of participating in inheritance and/or
> > polymorphism. An instance of an object is capable of doing so, per its
> > class definitions. Whereas a Python class object is not.
> >
> >     >>> class Master:
> >             def func(self):
> >                 pass
> >
> >     >>> class Sub(Master):
> >             pass
> >
> >     >>> Sub.func()
> >     TypeError: func() missing 1 required positional argument: 'self'
> >
> I have no idea what you're proving here. You just showed that the
> class has a function attached to it, and you didn't provide enough
> arguments to it. And types have their own set of attributes and
> methods:
> 

I admit it was a contrived example. I couldn't think of a way to 
demonstrate that a class object does not participate in its own 
inheritance rules. Only instances of it can.



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