Devanagari int literals [was Re: Should non-security 2.7 bugs be fixed?]

Tim Chase python.list at tim.thechases.com
Sun Jul 19 14:56:01 CEST 2015


On 2015-07-19 14:45, Steven D'Aprano wrote:
>> ie we can now do
>>>>> १ + २  
>> 3  
> 
> That is actually quite awesome, and I would support a new feature
> that set the numeric characters to a particular script, e.g. Latin,
> Arabic, Devanagari, whatever, and printed them in that same script.
> It seems unfortunate that १ + २ prints as 3 rather than ३.
> 
> Python already, and has for many years, supported non-ASCII digits
> in string conversions. This is in Python 2.4:
> 
> py> int(u'१२')  
> 12
> py> float(u'.१२')  
> 0.12
> 
> so the feature goes back a long time.

Agreed that it's pretty awesome.  It seems to have some holes though:

Python 3.4.2 (default, Oct  8 2014, 10:45:20) 
[GCC 4.9.1] on linux
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> print('\N{VULGAR FRACTION ONE EIGHTH}')
⅛
>>> print(float('\N{VULGAR FRACTION ONE EIGHTH}'))
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: could not convert string to float: '⅛'
>>> print('\N{ROMAN NUMERAL NINE}')
Ⅸ
>>> int('\N{ROMAN NUMERAL NINE}')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: 'Ⅸ'
>>> print('\N{ROMAN NUMERAL TEN THOUSAND}')
ↂ
>>> int('\N{ROMAN NUMERAL TEN THOUSAND}')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: 'ↂ'

-tkc






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