Choosing a Python IDE. what is your Pythonish recommendation? I do not know what to choose.

Tim Johnson tim at akwebsoft.com
Mon Jan 2 20:04:54 EST 2017


* Antonio Caminero Garcia <tonycamgar at gmail.com> [170102 02:50]:
<....> 

> Now, I am thinking about giving a try to Visual Studio Code
> Edition (take a look, it sounds good
> https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=donjayamanne.python).
> I need an editor for professional software development. What would
> you recommend to me?
  The best thing - as has been emphasised by others regarding this
  topic - is to establish tools, stick with them and learn them
  well.

  I use two approaches on linux:

  1)From Gnome terminal I run MC (midnight commander) as my default
  file manager with vim (in terminal mode) as the MC default editor.
  This method is used for ad-hoc editing of python source code, but
  also for system editing in general.

  2)I use emacs with elpy mode in GUI mode for large-scale work.
  Elpy is so helpful, I'm almost embarassed to admit being a
  pythonist. To compound the embarassment, the elpy developer is
  extremely helpful and very generous. :)

  -> I've used gvim (GUI mode) extensively in the past. 

  I find vim more "nimble", thus my preferance for quick-and-dirty
  edits. 
  
  Emacs, on the other hand, is enormously extendable and I have
  implemented extensive keymapping. For me, augmenting keymapping
  with the emacs help system trumps vim's more nimble approach. 
  
  In addition, I've implemented an auxilary help system using emacs'
  built-in browser so that I can call up category - based
  "cheat-sheats" with simple html highlighting and hyperlinking.

  My caveat is that both vim and emacs are a tough learning curve.
  Vimscript extends vim, elisp extends emacs. In both cases, one is
  essentially learning an additional programming language. 

  One's personal preference for input devices should also be
  considered, IMHO :

  I prefer the keyboard over pointing devices and a trackball over a
  mouse for pointing device. I use a small-footprint 68-key
  tenkeyless keyboard with a standalone keypad with my left hand
  (trackball is on the right). I've also programmed the keypad
  extensively for emacs.

  The bottom line, as others have stated, is to consistently stick
  with some approach that fits one's personal preferences. 
  
  We are fortunate to have so many options. 
  
-- 
Tim 
http://www.akwebsoft.com, http://www.tj49.com


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