You can always use jython. ;)<br><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">On 7/20/07, <b class="gmail_sendername"><a href="mailto:rvu44vs02@sneakemail.com">rvu44vs02@sneakemail.com</a></b> <<a href="mailto:rvu44vs02@sneakemail.com">
rvu44vs02@sneakemail.com</a>> wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">On Sun, 15 Jul 2007 at 22:28:08 -0700, Alex Martelli wrote:
<br>> James T. Dennis <<a href="mailto:jadestar@idiom.com">jadestar@idiom.com</a>> wrote:<br>>    ...<br>> >  You can start writing all your code now as: print() --- calling<br>> >  the statement as if it were a function.  Then you're future Python
<br>><br>> ...except that your output format will thereby become disgusting...:<br>><br>> >>> name = 'Alex'<br>> >>> print 'Hello', name, 'and welcome to my program!'
<br>> Hello Alex and welcome to my program!<br>> >>> print('Hello', name, 'and welcome to my program!')<br>> ('Hello', 'Alex', 'and welcome to my program!')<br>>
<br>> In Python 2.*, the parentheses will make a tuple, and so you'll get an<br>> output full of parentheses, quotes and commas.  I think it's pretty bad<br>> advice to give a newbie, to make his output as ugly as this.
<br>><br>><br>> Alex<br>> --<br><br>One possible kind of print function that might be used in the interim is<br>something like:<br><br><br>def print_fn(*args):<br>    """print on sys.stdout"""
<br>    arg_str = " ".join([str(x) for x in args])<br>    print arg_str<br><br>-Jim<br>--<br><a href="http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list">http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br><a href="http://www.goldwatches.com/watches.asp?Brand=14">http://www.goldwatches.com/watches.asp?Brand=14</a><br><a href="http://www.jewelerslounge.com">http://www.jewelerslounge.com
</a>