<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Feb 13, 2009 at 7:22 PM, Basilisk96 <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:basilisk96@gmail.com">basilisk96@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
On Feb 12, 10:39 pm, Damon <<a href="mailto:damonwisc...@gmail.com">damonwisc...@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
> * Like R, every time there is a new version of Python, the repository<br>
> should rebuild the packages, for all supported platforms, and make<br>
> available all those that compile cleanly. R also forces you to write<br>
> properly structured documentation for every exposed function, before<br>
> the repository will accept it.<br>
<br>
A very good idea indeed. I would love to start using Py3k today, but I<br>
am still on 2.5 because I depend on win32 binaries for the majority of<br>
my library packages. I can build some myself, but not all. A<br>
repository of prebuilt binaries that stay in step with currently<br>
available language releases would be most welcome.<br>
<br>
Just my $0.02,<br>
-Basilisk96</blockquote><div><br>With Py3K, it's a little bit more complicated than rebuilding all the packages. Because it broke compatibility, all of the C extensions have to be rewritten before they'll work. That's why it's taking longer to create Python 3 packages than to create 2.6 versions. <br>
</div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;"><br>
<font color="#888888">--<br>
<a href="http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list" target="_blank">http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list</a><br>
</font></blockquote></div><br>