<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body text="#000000" bgcolor="#FFFFFF">
    On 10/30/2012 10:29 PM, Michael Torrie wrote:
    <blockquote cite="mid:5090B743.4080507@gmail.com" type="cite">
      As this is the case, why this long discussion? If you are arguing
      for a
      change in Python to make it compatible with what this fork you are
      going
      to create will do, this has already been fairly thoroughly
      addressed
      earl on, and reasons why the semantics will not change anytime
      soon have
      been given.
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    I'm not arguing for a change in the present release of Python; and I
    have never done so.<br>
    Historically, if a fork happens to produce something surprisingly <u>useful</u>;
    the main code bank eventually accepts it on their own.  If a fork is
    a mistake, it dies on its own.<br>
    <br>
    That really is the way things ought to be done.<br>
    <br>
    <blockquote>include this<br>
      The Zen of Python, by <u>Tim Peters</u><br>
      ....<br>
      Special cases aren't special enough to break the rules.<br>
      Although <u>practicality beats purity</u>.<br>
      ....<br>
      <br>
    </blockquote>
    Now, I have seen several coded projects where the idea of cyclic
    lists is PRACTICAL;<br>
    and the idea of iterating slices may be practical if they could be
    made *FASTER*.<br>
    <br>
    These warrant looking into -- and carefully;  and that means making
    an experimental fork; preferably before I attempt to micro-port the
    python.<br>
    <br>
    Regarding the continuing discussion:<br>
    The more I learn, the more informed decisions I can make regarding
    implementation.<br>
    I am almost fully understanding the questions I originally asked,
    now.<br>
    <br>
    What remains are mostly questions about compatibility wrappers, and
    how to allow them to be used -- or selectively deleted when not
    necessary; and perhaps a demonstration or two about how slices and
    named tuples can (or can't) perform nearly the same function in
    slice processing.<br>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>