<div dir="ltr">OK, now the trick; adding `data = None` inside the generator works, but in my actual code I wrap my generator inside of `enumerate()`, which seems to obviate the "fix".  Can I get it to play nice or am I forced to count manually. Is that a feature?</div>

<div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Feb 14, 2014 at 9:21 PM, Roy Smith <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:roy@panix.com" target="_blank">roy@panix.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

In article <<a href="mailto:mailman.6952.1392433921.18130.python-list@python.org">mailman.6952.1392433921.18130.python-list@python.org</a>>,<br>
<div><div class="h5"> Nick Timkovich <<a href="mailto:prometheus235@gmail.com">prometheus235@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
<br>
> Ah, I think I was equating `yield` too closely with `return` in my head.<br>
>  Whereas `return` results in the destruction of the function's locals,<br>
> `yield` I should have known keeps them around, a la C's `static` functions.<br>
>  Many thanks!<br>
<br>
</div></div>It's not quite like C's static.  With C's static, the static variables<br>
are per-function.  In Python, yield creates a context per invocation.<br>
Thus, I can do<br>
<br>
def f():<br>
    for i in range(10000):<br>
        yield i<br>
<br>
g1 = f()<br>
g2 = f()<br>
print g1.next()<br>
print g1.next()<br>
print g1.next()<br>
print g2.next()<br>
print g1.next()<br>
<br>
<br>
which prints 0, 1, 2, 0, 3.  There's two contexts active at the same<br>
time, with a distinct instance of "i" in each one.<br>
<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888">--<br>
<a href="https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list" target="_blank">https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list</a><br>
</font></span></blockquote></div><br></div>