<p dir="ltr"><br>
On Oct 15, 2014 7:04 PM, "Cameron Simpson" <<a href="mailto:cs@zip.com.au">cs@zip.com.au</a>> wrote:<br>
><br>
> On 15Oct2014 16:09, Dan Stromberg <<a href="mailto:drsalists@gmail.com">drsalists@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
>><br>
>> On Wed, Oct 15, 2014 at 3:50 PM, ryguy7272 <<a href="mailto:ryanshuell@gmail.com">ryanshuell@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
>>><br>
>>> #1)  That's very bizarre to mix single quotes and double quotes in a single      language.  Does Python actually mix single quotes and double quotes?<br>
>><br>
>><br>
>> I'm not sure what you mean by "mix".  C uses single quotes and double<br>
>> quotes, right?<br>
><br>
><br>
> Yes, but it uses single quotes for characters (a single byte integer type) and double quotes for strings. Python doesn't really have a single character type, and lets the user use either quote mark as they see fit. Ryan finds this unfamiliar.</p>
<p dir="ltr">In any case, it's hardly bizarre; it's common among interpreted languages. Other languages that allow both single- and double-quote strings include ECMAScript and Lua. Perl, PHP and Ruby also have both variants but distinguish between them for interpolation.</p>