<p dir="ltr">Is 3.x the default on ubuntu now? My 14.10 is still 2.7. Although it does have python3 installed.</p>
<br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">On Thu, 3 Sep 2015 16:40¬†Chris Angelico <<a href="mailto:rosuav@gmail.com">rosuav@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">On Fri, Sep 4, 2015 at 1:31 AM, Luca Menegotto<br>
<<a href="mailto:otlucaDELETE@deleteyahoo.it" target="_blank">otlucaDELETE@deleteyahoo.it</a>> wrote:<br>
> Il 03/09/2015 16:32, Heli Nix ha scritto:<br>
><br>
>> How can I do this in Linux ?<br>
><br>
><br>
> As far as I know, in general a Linux distro comes with Python already<br>
> installed.<br>
> All you have to do is check if the installed version matches your needs.<br>
> Tipically, you'll find Python 2.7; however, I know there are distros with<br>
> Python3.x as default (Fedora?)<br>
<br>
Also Ubuntu. If you want to work across multiple Linux distros, the<br>
easiest way is to tell people to install either "python2" or "python3"<br>
using their system package manager, and then use that.<br>
<br>
ChrisA<br>
--<br>
<a href="https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list</a><br>
</blockquote></div><div dir="ltr">-- <br></div><div dir="ltr">¬†- Nick</div>