<div dir="ltr">Hi All<div><br></div><div>New to this mail list and python in general, but I have in the past participated in the Java Ranch - Cattle Drive</div><div><br></div><div><a href="http://www.javaranch.com/java-college.jsp">http://www.javaranch.com/java-college.jsp</a><br></div><div><br></div><div>The exercises start off easy enough, but the markers are sticklers for their style guide and on good quality code.</div><div><br></div><div>I haven't seen any thing like this for Python (but I haven't looked too hard)</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 20 May 2016 at 09:27, Derek O'Connell <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:doc@doconnel.f9.co.uk" target="_blank">doc@doconnel.f9.co.uk</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">I doubt I need to preach about it here but I'd still liked to suggest<br>
starting by simply having fun! If your friend has a personal<br>
interest/hobby where programming can be used for exploration then grab a<br>
module that does most of the grunt work and start hacking away at the<br>
examples for his own purposes. It's the best and quickest way to get new<br>
programmers over that initial hump without swamping them. If he has<br>
absolutely no experience then I'd even suggest something like Scratch*<br>
to begin with to get the general idea of translating ideas into code. I<br>
also love Jupyter notebooks for this situation so that personal (rich)<br>
notes can be kept local to code as learning progresses.<br>
<br>
* It's easy to transition from Scratch to Python while still having fun<br>
with the help of modules such as <a href="https://github.com/pilliq/scratchpy" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://github.com/pilliq/scratchpy</a><br>
<br>
Btw, I would be really interested to hear fun and practical links<br>
between philosophy and programming for learning purposes. Of course<br>
there's a long history linking philosophy, maths and programming. Books<br>
like "Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid" might provide some<br>
inspiration.<br>
<br>
-D<br>
<br>
On 18/05/16 10:59, John via python-uk wrote:<br>
> Hi all,<br>
><br>
> A philosopher friend of mine wants to transition into working as a software<br>
> developer (paying work in philosophy being a bit rare). He lives in London,<br>
> and is considering signing up for one of the Coding "Bootcamps" that<br>
> various organisations run. I wondered if any of you have any<br>
> recommendations you could make, and indeed whether any of these bootcamps<br>
> teach Python?<br>
><br>
> Thanks,<br>
><br>
> John<br>
><br>
><br>
><br>
> _______________________________________________<br>
> python-uk mailing list<br>
> <a href="mailto:python-uk@python.org">python-uk@python.org</a><br>
> <a href="https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-uk" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-uk</a><br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
python-uk mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:python-uk@python.org">python-uk@python.org</a><br>
<a href="https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-uk" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-uk</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br></div>