<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2//EN">
<HTML>
<HEAD>
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<META NAME="Generator" CONTENT="MS Exchange Server version 6.5.7651.59">
<TITLE>RE: [Web-SIG] [Proposal] &quot;website&quot; and first-level conf (was: morecomments on Paste Deploy)</TITLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY>
<!-- Converted from text/plain format -->

<P><FONT SIZE=2>Chad Whitacre wrote:<BR>
&gt; First, we define a &quot;website&quot; on the filesystem as a<BR>
&gt; Unix-y userland with, at minimum, the following:<BR>
&gt;<BR>
&gt;&nbsp;&nbsp; etc/&lt;foo&gt;.conf<BR>
&gt;&nbsp;&nbsp; lib/python<BR>
&gt;<BR>
&gt; Second, we adopt a simple ini-style format for &lt;foo&gt;.conf,<BR>
&gt; which handles low-level process config. This file would<BR>
&gt; then point to a second, framework-specific configuration<BR>
&gt; layer.<BR>
<BR>
I really don't see why we need a standard scaffolding (folder<BR>
arrangement) just to read in a config file. Why can't the<BR>
location of the site config file be passed as an argument<BR>
to the invocation script? Keep in mind that some platforms<BR>
will not allow deployers write access to any folders in which<BR>
application code is kept...<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
Robert Brewer<BR>
System Architect<BR>
Amor Ministries<BR>
fumanchu@amor.org</FONT>
</P>

</BODY>
</HTML>