<div dir="ltr">Sorry, if this turns up twice ...<br><br>Phillip J. Eby  wrote, on Tue Jul 29 03:21:18 CEST 2008:<br><br>&quot;There is no async API that&#39;s part of WSGI itself, and it&#39;s <br>unlikely there will ever be one unless there ends up <br>
being an async API for Python as well.&quot;<br><br><a href="http://mail.python.org/pipermail/web-sig/2008-July/003547.html">http://mail.python.org/pipermail/web-sig/2008-July/003547.html</a><br><br><br>Following up, perhaps this would be of interest:<br>
<br>&quot;New PEP proposal: C Micro-Threading&quot;<br><br>&quot;This PEP adds micro-threading (or &#39;green threads&#39;) <br>at the C level so that micro-threading is built in and <br>can be used with very little coding effort at the python <br>
level.<br><br>The implementation is quite similar to the Twisted <br>Deferred_/Reactor_ model, but applied at the C level <br>by extending the C API slightly.&nbsp; Doing this provides <br>the Twisted capabilities to python, without requiring <br>
the python programmer to code in the Twisted event <br>driven style. Thus, legacy python code would gain <br>the benefits that Twisted provides with very little <br>modification.<br><br>Burying the event driven mechanism in the C level <br>
should also give the same benefits to python GUI <br>interface
 tools so that the python programmers don&#39;t <br>have to deal with event driven programming there <br>either.<br><br>This capability may also be used to provide some <br>of the features that Stackless Python provides, <br>
such as microthreads and channels (here, called <br>micro_pipes).&quot;<br><br><a href="http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-ideas/2008-August/001788.html">http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-ideas/2008-August/001788.html</a><br>
<br>At first glance, the brilliant bit seems to be that <br>the existing Python exception handling process <br>would be applied to async operations, without <br>requiring a &quot;Twisted&quot; coding style.<br><br>BTW, the PEP author, Bruce Frederiksen, is the author <br>
who presented at PyCon, in Chicago, about PyKE, his <br>Python Knowledge Engine project, that makes <br>&quot;compilable&quot; much of what is done dynamically in <br>many popular Python Web Frameworks. The potential <br>
to address the &quot;Python is Slow!&quot; meme may  be <br>significant, as seen
 here:<br><br><a href="http://groups.google.com/group/pyke/browse_thread/thread/433dd213e581536f">http://groups.google.com/group/pyke/browse_thread/thread/433dd213e581536f</a><br><br>Just a &quot;heads up&quot; from a longtime lurker,<br>
Jerry Spicklemire<br><br></div>