Best practice in organize classes into modules

Steven Woody narkewoody at gmail.com
Fri Jan 9 08:10:17 CET 2009


On Fri, Jan 9, 2009 at 2:52 PM, Steve Holden <steve at holdenweb.com> wrote:
> Chris Rebert wrote:
>> On Thu, Jan 8, 2009 at 9:09 PM, Steven Woody <narkewoody at gmail.com> wrote:
>>> On Fri, Jan 9, 2009 at 1:02 PM, James Mills
>>> <prologic at shortcircuit.net.au> wrote:
>>>> On Fri, Jan 9, 2009 at 2:57 PM, Steven Woody <narkewoody at gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>> In C++/Java, people usually put one class into one file.  What's the
>>>>> suggestion on this topic in Python?  I so much interesting this
>>>>> especially when exception classes also involved.
>>>> Normally i group related functionality into the one module.
>>> Will that lead to too large source file size?  Is there a
>>> recommendation on max lines of a python source?  Thanks.
>>
>> I don't think there's really a hard-and-fast rule (just like in Java &
>> C++!). When the program starts to feel unwieldly, then start splitting
>> it into multiple modules. Python files can generally contain several
>> classes and functions and still be quite manageable.
>>
> The OP can take a look at the standard library to get some impression of
> what's been considered acceptable over the years. Just remember that
> some of the code is a little antiquated, as working code is not
> rewritten just for the fun of fixing the bugs this would inject.
>
> regards
>  Steve
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Thanks for all your inputs!



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