Advanced Python books?

UrsusMaximus at gmail.com UrsusMaximus at gmail.com
Mon May 18 22:12:49 CEST 2009


You might try Expert Python Programming by Tarek Ziadé. It is a
relatively recent book aimed at "experts". There are several reviews
of the book linked to from <a href="http://www.awaretek.com/
book.html">this page</a>.

Ron


On May 18, 1:04 pm, kj <so... at 987jk.com.invalid> wrote:
> I have read a couple of "learn Python"-type books, and now I'm
> looking for some more advanced books on Python, something analogous
> to "Effective Java" or "High-Order Perl".  I've only been able to
> find "Advanced Python 3 Programming Techniques", which, as far as
> I can tell, is only available as a "Kindle Book".  (Since I won't
> be buying a Kindle for another few decades, this is not an option
> for me.)
>
> I tried out "Dive into Python", because I was told that it was
> written for people with prior programming experience.  It's an OK
> book, but I don't find that it is much more advanced than pretty
> much any other "learn Python" book I've seen.
>
> Basically I'm looking for a book that assumes that one has the
> basics of the language down, and instead focuses on standard problems
> of software development, such as application architecture and
> design, prototyping, debugging, profiling and performance-tuning,
> testing, packaging/distribution, extending/embedding, threading
> and IPC, persistence, etc., and on various prototypical cases such
> as command-line utilities, GUI-apps, webapps, database-backed apps,
> simulations, etc.
>
> Granted, it is unlikely that a single book will do justice to all
> these areas, but these are the topics I'm now interested in, from
> the perspective of Python.
>
> Any suggestions?
>
> TIA!
> --
> NOTE: In my address everything before the first period is backwards;
> and the last period, and everything after it, should be discarded.




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